South Africa needs a dose of #CommonSense

Despite what some politicians, activist-journalists, radio talk show hosts, and others would have you believe, South Africans actually have a lot in common and we all have a healthy dose of #CommonSense – common sense which the government could use.

The #CommonSense that South Africans have is clear in what we think the government should focus on and about 80% of South Africans agree broadly on the major issues facing South Africa. For example:

  • South Africans want job creation, fighting corruption, better education, and fighting crime to be the top priorities of government;
  • The majority of South Africans feel that race relations are now better than they were in 1994;
  • The majority of South Africans want people to be appointed on merit, with special training for disadvantaged people, irrespective of race;
  • The majority of South Africans want sports teams to be selected on merit and not race quotas;
  • The majority of South Africans don’t care what the race of their child’s teacher is, as long as that teacher is good;
  • The majority of South Africans feel that politicians use talk of racism and colonialism as excuses for their own failures; and
  • The majority of South Africans agree that more jobs and quality education are the solutions to end inequalities between races.

If you agree with what you have read then fill in the form below. We will lobby the government on your behalf to scrap race-based laws and which prevent South Africans from fulfilling their full potential, by also lobbying the government to implement policy which creates jobs. It’s only with the support of ordinary South Africans that we can turn the tide on bad policy that prevents South Africa reaching its potential.

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