Submissions on proposed legislation


Submission to the Department of Justice and Correctional Services, regarding the Unlawful Entry on Premises Bill of 2022

16 September 2022 – In this submission to the Department of Justice and Correctional Services on the Unlawful Entry on Premises Bill of 2022, the IRR warns that especially in the light of the already high number of land invasions – and the risk that these will escalate once the Expropriation Bill and the Land Court Bill come into operation – various serious deficiencies in this legislation require urgent attention.

IRR Submission to the National Coronavirus Command Council, Supporting the Proposal to Repeal National Health Act Regulations on the Critical Control Measures to contain the spread of COVID-19

21 June 2022 – In this submission to the National Coronavirus Command Council in support of the Proposal to Repeal National Health Act Regulations on the Critical Control Measures to contain the spread of COVID-19, the Institute of Race Relations endorses Health Minister Joe Phaahla’s call to lift the mask mandates, vaccine passes and capacity limits on gatherings.

IRR Submission to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education regarding the Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill of 2022 [B2 -2022]

15 June 2022 – In this submission to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on the Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, the Institute of Race Relations recommends withdrawing some damaging amendments, and giving more time to evaluating the others, in order to the meet the primary objective of embracing real reforms aimed at effectively improving the quality of schooling.

Submission to the Portfolio Committee on Environment, Forestry and Fisheries regarding the Climate Change Bill of 2022 [B9 -2022]

27 May 2022 – In this submission to the Portfolio Committee on Environment, Forestry and Fisheries, the Institute of Race Relations argues that the Climate Change Bill of 2022 is unconstitutional, both procedurally and in terms of its substantive content, and warns that, if enacted, it will over-burden an already failing state and have many other adverse consequences, including exacerbating indoor pollution, crippling the economy, and pushing up already astronomical unemployment rates.

IRR Submission to the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs regarding the Proposed Disaster Management Act Regulations Dated March 29 2022

1 April 2022 – In this submission to the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs on the Proposed Disaster Management Act Regulations, the IRR argues that there should be no further delay in ending the State of Disaster; that there can be no legal authority for extending disaster regulations once the state of disaster has ended; and that many of the Regulations proposed are irrational and hence unconstitutional.

IRR Oral Presentation: Hate Crimes, Hate Speech Bill [B9-2018]

29 March 2022 – In this oral presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Justice and Correctional Services on the Combating and Prevention of Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill of 2018, the IRR argues that the flaws in the Bill include hate speech provisions that are unconstitutional, and hate crime provisions that are unnecessary.

IRR Submission to the Department of Social Development, regarding the the Social Relief of Distress Procedure Manual under the Social Assistance Act of 2004

23 March 2022 – In this submission on the the Social Relief of Distress Procedure Manual under the Social Assistance Act of 2004, the IRR argues that oth the Manual and the Regulations (see the IRR’s 11 March 2022 submission on the Amended Regulations to the Social Assistance Act) should be abandoned until such time as a proper socio-economic impact assessment has been carried out and its results made available to the public.

IRR Submission to the Department of Social Development, regarding the Amended Regulations of 2022 to the Social Assistance Act of 2004

11 March 2022 – In this submission on the Amended Regulations of 2022 to the Social Assistance Act of 2004, the IRR warns that if the Regulations are adopted in their current form, the fiscal cliff will draw closer, growth will wither further, public debt and interest payments will expand, unemployment will worsen, and the jobless poor are likely to become ever more dependent on shrinking social grants that cannot be maintained.

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