Our own writing in the media

Every year our analysts and policy experts, in promoting new ideas and policies, contribute a wide range of articles to newspapers across South Africa.
Click here to sign up
Join the conversation
You are here: Home Reports & Publications Our own writing in the media

Our own writing in the media

Every year our analysts and policy experts, in promoting new ideas and policies, contribute a wide range of articles to newspapers across South Africa.

Vavi's ANC lament: full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? - Business Day, 11th April 2011.

MEMBERS of Parliament sitting on its justice committee were recently reported to have been "visibly shocked" at evidence of corruption and incompetence.

Read More…

'Turmoil in the party shows limitations of 'democratic centralism'' - Business Day, 28 March 2011.

John Kane-Berman argues that conventional wisdom has it that the violence flaring up periodically around the country arises from anger over poor "service delivery".

Read More…

South African Institute of Race Relations comments on 2011/2012 budget - NGO Pulse, 25 February 2011.

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s 2011 Budget shows why South Africa is rated as the most transparent government in accounting for its expenditure, as the document openly addresses pressing issues facing South Africa. The three biggest areas of spending are education, social protection and health. A notable inclusion is funding for the environment.

Read More…

Proposed new labour laws are mother of all madness - Business Day, 31 January 2011.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that the proposed new labour laws will harm, not help, the unemployment situation in the country.

Read More…

Labour market liberalisation is the elephant in the room - Business Day, 6th December 2010

John Kane-Berman argues that Ebrahim Patel's New Growth Plan is a nonstarter.

Read More…

Ruling party's antipathy towards NGOs has never gone away - Business Day, 13 September 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that it is not only the media that is at risk from the ruling party.

Read More…

Money will not cure the ills of the public healthcare sector - Business Day, 11 October 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that the propsed introduction of the National Health Insurance scheme is another example of the ANC's proclivity "to put the cart before the horse".

Read More…

Empty promises make it harder for the state to destroy jobs - Business Day, 8th November 2010.

John Kane-Berman argues that the Government's new plan to create five million new jobs over a ten year period is nothing new, neither of which is the widespread criticism that has met it.

Read More…

Efforts to stop racial fronting likely to be futile once again - Business Day, 22nd November 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that racial fronting in companies is likely to continue despite the Government's efforts to stop it.

Read More…

Efforts to stop racial fronting likely to futile once again - Business Day, 22nd November 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that stopping racial fronting in companies is likely to be futile, just as it was when it occurred during apartheid.

Read More…

IRR TV

Vavi's ANC lament: full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? - Business Day, 11th April 2011.

MEMBERS of Parliament sitting on its justice committee were recently reported to have been "visibly shocked" at evidence of corruption and incompetence.

Read More…

'Turmoil in the party shows limitations of 'democratic centralism'' - Business Day, 28 March 2011.

John Kane-Berman argues that conventional wisdom has it that the violence flaring up periodically around the country arises from anger over poor "service delivery".

Read More…

South African Institute of Race Relations comments on 2011/2012 budget - NGO Pulse, 25 February 2011.

Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s 2011 Budget shows why South Africa is rated as the most transparent government in accounting for its expenditure, as the document openly addresses pressing issues facing South Africa. The three biggest areas of spending are education, social protection and health. A notable inclusion is funding for the environment.

Read More…

Proposed new labour laws are mother of all madness - Business Day, 31 January 2011.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that the proposed new labour laws will harm, not help, the unemployment situation in the country.

Read More…

Labour market liberalisation is the elephant in the room - Business Day, 6th December 2010

John Kane-Berman argues that Ebrahim Patel's New Growth Plan is a nonstarter.

Read More…

Ruling party's antipathy towards NGOs has never gone away - Business Day, 13 September 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that it is not only the media that is at risk from the ruling party.

Read More…

Money will not cure the ills of the public healthcare sector - Business Day, 11 October 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that the propsed introduction of the National Health Insurance scheme is another example of the ANC's proclivity "to put the cart before the horse".

Read More…

Empty promises make it harder for the state to destroy jobs - Business Day, 8th November 2010.

John Kane-Berman argues that the Government's new plan to create five million new jobs over a ten year period is nothing new, neither of which is the widespread criticism that has met it.

Read More…

Efforts to stop racial fronting likely to be futile once again - Business Day, 22nd November 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that racial fronting in companies is likely to continue despite the Government's efforts to stop it.

Read More…

Efforts to stop racial fronting likely to futile once again - Business Day, 22nd November 2010.

In his fortnightly column in Business Day, John Kane-Berman argues that stopping racial fronting in companies is likely to be futile, just as it was when it occurred during apartheid.

Read More…

Free Society Project