Invitation: Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common

Free Market Foundation Youth cordially invites you to Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common, by Leon Louw (FMF Executive Director) on Saturday, 23 April 2016.
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Invitation: Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common

Free Market Foundation Youth cordially invites you to Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common, by Leon Louw (FMF Executive Director) on Saturday, 23 April 2016.

Free Market Foundation Youth

cordially invites you to a presentation and discussion
on Saturday, 23 April 2016

Leon Louw (FMF Executive Director)

‘’Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common’’


All three judgements were popular because they satisfied prevailing sentiment, prejudice and perceived selfish interests.

What they had in common jurisprudentially, and why they might come home to haunt those who celebrated them, is less obvious.

Far from being enlightened days in South African law, they have disturbing implications for justice, the rule of law, constitutionality and, above all, our most vulnerable citizens. They are examples, for instance, of what lawyers mean when they say "hard cases make bad law".

All three cases were celebrated because they were, for the majority of observers, against unpopular people. But the principles they established can now be used and abused against those who welcomed them and the millions of unsophisticated, defenceless people that, superficially, the judgements appeared to serve.

This will be an unapologetically controversial presentation. Some might find it disturbing because it will challenge deeply held convictions and prejudices. It will address issues about which every decent person should anguish.

If you are not persuaded to change your mind, you will, at least, be forced to think more critically and clearly about knee-jerk responses to seemingly virtuous developments in the course of events.

Registration: 09h30 – 10h00 Refreshments will be available
Presentation: 10h00 – 11h30

Venue: FMF, Block 5 Bryanston Gate, 170 Curzon Road, Bryanston
(Opposite Sandton Medi-Clinic)

To secure your seat, RSVP to the following link:

http://www.freemarketfoundation.com/View-Event?i=112  Essential as seating is limited.
(If you have already responded or cannot join us, no need to RSVP)

Queries: Phumlani M UMajozi – 011 884 0270 / 071 898 9729 / phumlanimajozi@fmfsa.org

About the Free Market Foundation (Southern Africa):

The FMF is an independent public benefit organisation founded in 1975 to promote and foster an open society, the rule of law, personal liberty, and economic and press freedom as fundamental components of its advocacy of human rights and democracy based on classical liberal principles. It is financed by membership subscriptions, donations and sponsorships.

About Leon Marais Louw:

Leon Louw is a well-known South African personality who, for over a generation, has been active in diverse aspects of public life. He is credited with having had a significant impact on the course of events in South Africa, especially regarding the extensive economic reforms that took place during the last two decades of apartheid. He has received numerous international awards, and, with his wife, Frances Kendall, has been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize. Presently he is the Executive Director of the Free Market Foundation (FMF) and of the Law Review Project (LRP).

Leon co-authored South Africa: The Solution and Let the People Govern – both of which had a significant impact on the constitutional process. SA: The Solution has been republished in various countries, including the USA and Canada, as After Apartheid, the Solution for the South Africa. Many of the authors’ specific proposals for the post-apartheid constitution were incorporated in South Africa’s new constitution, despite having been almost uniformly dismissed at the time of publication.

Leon has spoken and lectured in 30 countries, and has been a guest speaker for many of the world’s most prestigious organisations. He has given guest lectures or debated with scholarly opponents at all of South Africa’s universities, and has been consulted by many corporations, political parties and governments (directly or through the FMF, he has been consulted by various governments including South Africa, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Namibia, Zambia, Russia (Yakut), China, Hong Kong, Malta, Malawi and Swaziland; he also assisted government advisors informally in Ghana, Hungary, Mauritius, Surinam and former Czechoslovakia). Leon has also played a key role in the establishment of half a dozen of South Africa’s most respected institutes and NGOs.

Small and micro business, and black economic empowerment, have been Leon’s principle interest throughout his public life. He has been intimately involved with and a prominent activist for organised and informal SMMEs, starting with the fledgling National African Federation of Chambers of Commerce (NAFCOC) and Johannesburg Street Vendors in the late 1960s. Much of his life presently is spent with grassroots black communities in tribal areas and inner cities, fighting for their right to trade freely and own the land they occupy.

Leon is married to Frances Kendall, author and artist, and has three daughters, Justine, Camilla and Kate. He loves classical music, especially Beethoven, travel (including to Vanuatu and Roratonga), nature, jogging and hiking.  He is a storehouse of worthless information, being fascinated by anything curious, weird or bizarre. He is a contrarian who loves playing devil's advocate. He has recently ghost written a novel based in India. 

IRR TV

Free Market Foundation Youth

cordially invites you to a presentation and discussion
on Saturday, 23 April 2016

Leon Louw (FMF Executive Director)

‘’Dangerous Law: What the Zuma, Pistorius and Afriforum judgements have in common’’


All three judgements were popular because they satisfied prevailing sentiment, prejudice and perceived selfish interests.

What they had in common jurisprudentially, and why they might come home to haunt those who celebrated them, is less obvious.

Far from being enlightened days in South African law, they have disturbing implications for justice, the rule of law, constitutionality and, above all, our most vulnerable citizens. They are examples, for instance, of what lawyers mean when they say "hard cases make bad law".

All three cases were celebrated because they were, for the majority of observers, against unpopular people. But the principles they established can now be used and abused against those who welcomed them and the millions of unsophisticated, defenceless people that, superficially, the judgements appeared to serve.

This will be an unapologetically controversial presentation. Some might find it disturbing because it will challenge deeply held convictions and prejudices. It will address issues about which every decent person should anguish.

If you are not persuaded to change your mind, you will, at least, be forced to think more critically and clearly about knee-jerk responses to seemingly virtuous developments in the course of events.

Registration: 09h30 – 10h00 Refreshments will be available
Presentation: 10h00 – 11h30

Venue: FMF, Block 5 Bryanston Gate, 170 Curzon Road, Bryanston
(Opposite Sandton Medi-Clinic)

To secure your seat, RSVP to the following link:

http://www.freemarketfoundation.com/View-Event?i=112  Essential as seating is limited.
(If you have already responded or cannot join us, no need to RSVP)

Queries: Phumlani M UMajozi – 011 884 0270 / 071 898 9729 / phumlanimajozi@fmfsa.org

About the Free Market Foundation (Southern Africa):

The FMF is an independent public benefit organisation founded in 1975 to promote and foster an open society, the rule of law, personal liberty, and economic and press freedom as fundamental components of its advocacy of human rights and democracy based on classical liberal principles. It is financed by membership subscriptions, donations and sponsorships.

About Leon Marais Louw:

Leon Louw is a well-known South African personality who, for over a generation, has been active in diverse aspects of public life. He is credited with having had a significant impact on the course of events in South Africa, especially regarding the extensive economic reforms that took place during the last two decades of apartheid. He has received numerous international awards, and, with his wife, Frances Kendall, has been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize. Presently he is the Executive Director of the Free Market Foundation (FMF) and of the Law Review Project (LRP).

Leon co-authored South Africa: The Solution and Let the People Govern – both of which had a significant impact on the constitutional process. SA: The Solution has been republished in various countries, including the USA and Canada, as After Apartheid, the Solution for the South Africa. Many of the authors’ specific proposals for the post-apartheid constitution were incorporated in South Africa’s new constitution, despite having been almost uniformly dismissed at the time of publication.

Leon has spoken and lectured in 30 countries, and has been a guest speaker for many of the world’s most prestigious organisations. He has given guest lectures or debated with scholarly opponents at all of South Africa’s universities, and has been consulted by many corporations, political parties and governments (directly or through the FMF, he has been consulted by various governments including South Africa, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Namibia, Zambia, Russia (Yakut), China, Hong Kong, Malta, Malawi and Swaziland; he also assisted government advisors informally in Ghana, Hungary, Mauritius, Surinam and former Czechoslovakia). Leon has also played a key role in the establishment of half a dozen of South Africa’s most respected institutes and NGOs.

Small and micro business, and black economic empowerment, have been Leon’s principle interest throughout his public life. He has been intimately involved with and a prominent activist for organised and informal SMMEs, starting with the fledgling National African Federation of Chambers of Commerce (NAFCOC) and Johannesburg Street Vendors in the late 1960s. Much of his life presently is spent with grassroots black communities in tribal areas and inner cities, fighting for their right to trade freely and own the land they occupy.

Leon is married to Frances Kendall, author and artist, and has three daughters, Justine, Camilla and Kate. He loves classical music, especially Beethoven, travel (including to Vanuatu and Roratonga), nature, jogging and hiking.  He is a storehouse of worthless information, being fascinated by anything curious, weird or bizarre. He is a contrarian who loves playing devil's advocate. He has recently ghost written a novel based in India. 

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